Workshops | Block C

County Hall Suite
  1. What does the research evidence say about the role of Ofsted and the EBacc? | Tom Richmond
  2. How do we ensure we meet the needs of ALL young people? Our lived experience and what we want for the future. | Vic Goddard
  3. Schools where teachers improve: challenges and solutions. | David Weston
  4. Education, Poverty and Alternative Voices. | Ian Gilbert

Two further workshops will be announced in Jan 2020.

  1. What does the research evidence say about the role of Ofsted and the EBacc? | Tom Richmond. In this presentation, Tom will discuss his recent publications that summarised the best available evidence on two of the most contentious topics in our education system. The first report analysed whether Ofsted inspections produce accurate and consistent judgements as well as the impact that inspections have on schools and headteachers. The second report assessed the EBacc in terms of how subject entries have changed since 2010 and whether the EBacc is helping or hurting pupils around the country.
  2. How do we ensure we meet the needs of the ALL young people? Our lived experience and what we want for the future. | Vic Goddard. Session synopsis – TBA
  3. Schools where teachers improve: challenges and solutions. | David Weston. Session synopsis – Helping teachers improve is a key priority for every headteacher. In this talk, David will explore everything from CPD, performance management and wider leadership of change and improvement. He will draw ideas from research and practice to synthesise key ideas about how we can lead schools where teachers become more effective in a sustainable way.
  4. How do we ensure we meet the needs of the ALL young people? Our lived experience and what we want for the future. | Ian Gilbert. Session synopsis – Award-winning education writer and speaker Ian Gilbert will explore ten important themes from the best selling book The Working Class. With the academic gap refusing to close and the world around us becoming increasingly challenging for our most vulnerable families, what are the alternative ways we can approach working with the children and young people in the communities who need our help the most.

 

Sessions